Photos

Description

Cotton Hollow Preserve

Glastonbury Town Park

83 acres in Glastonbury, CT

Parking: Medium sized lot for “Residents Only” near 501 Hopewell Road Glastonbury, CT

Trail Map


Cotton Hollow is a popular swimming and hiking spot with locals, though everyone should be sure to visit it.  The main entrance near the Grange Pool is the trailhead for the .4 North Trail which follows Roaring Brook downstream through hemlock and black birch.  There is a great swimming hole along a series of cascades (ask me about the time I saved a dog stuck on a ledge at the swimming hole in November).  The area is similar to Natchaug State Forest and is a great place to spend time along the river.

The second trail at Cotton Hollow is the Tree Trail behind the restaurant near 841 CT Rt. 17.  Named for the many varieties of trees along the trail, most are marked for identification.  From the trail map, “It is hard to imagine that the area crossed by this trail was once a busy recreational park, popular with
trolley passengers from Hartford. ”

History:

Right next to the river (on private property) are the ruins of the Hartford Manufacturing Co. cotton mill part of the industrial corridor at Cotton Hollow. From the town’s site, “During the 18th and 19th centuries, the area was home to several gristmills, sawmills, iron foundries and a cotton mill. The imposing ruins of the cotton mill built in 1814 are still visible today. ”

From the Autumn article below, “One of the best-known mills in town was Pratt’s Forge, which once existed within the present-day preserve. Also known as South Glastonbury Iron Works, the company forged 3,900-pound anchors for oceangoing vessels out of New York City and for shipyards in Portland and Essex. In 1960, one of Pratt’s descendants, Amy Pratt, would be the first to donate land for the preserve.”


Links:

Hartford Courant (Marteka?) – Autumn in South Glastonbury’s Cotton Hollow

Peter Marteka – Glastonbury Aims to Preserve Storied History of Cotton Hollow

Waterfalls of New England – Cotton Hollow Cascades

The information shown here is for general reference purposes only. exploreCT.org gives no warranty, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy or reliability of this data. Parking in all areas, whether designated here or not, is at your own risk. exploreCT.org is not responsible for any damage or loss to vehicles or contents.

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Parking: Medium sized lot for “Residents Only” near 501 Hopewell Road Glastonbury, CT

Trail Map


Cotton Hollow is a popular swimming and hiking spot with locals, though everyone should be sure to visit it.  The main entrance near the Grange Pool is the trailhead for the .4 North Trail which follows Roaring Brook downstream through hemlock and black birch.  There is a great swimming hole along a series of cascades (ask me about the time I saved a dog stuck on a ledge at the swimming hole in November).  The area is similar to Natchaug State Forest and is a great place to spend time along the river.

The second trail at Cotton Hollow is the Tree Trail behind the restaurant near 841 CT Rt. 17.  Named for the many varieties of trees along the trail, most are marked for identification.  From the trail map, “It is hard to imagine that the area crossed by this trail was once a busy recreational park, popular with
trolley passengers from Hartford. ”

History:

Right next to the river (on private property) are the ruins of the Hartford Manufacturing Co. cotton mill part of the industrial corridor at Cotton Hollow. From the town’s site, “During the 18th and 19th centuries, the area was home to several gristmills, sawmills, iron foundries and a cotton mill. The imposing ruins of the cotton mill built in 1814 are still visible today. ”

From the Autumn article below, “One of the best-known mills in town was Pratt’s Forge, which once existed within the present-day preserve. Also known as South Glastonbury Iron Works, the company forged 3,900-pound anchors for oceangoing vessels out of New York City and for shipyards in Portland and Essex. In 1960, one of Pratt’s descendants, Amy Pratt, would be the first to donate land for the preserve.”


Links:

Hartford Courant (Marteka?) – Autumn in South Glastonbury’s Cotton Hollow

Peter Marteka – Glastonbury Aims to Preserve Storied History of Cotton Hollow

Waterfalls of New England – Cotton Hollow Cascades

The information shown here is for general reference purposes only. exploreCT.org gives no warranty, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy or reliability of this data. Parking in all areas, whether designated here or not, is at your own risk. exploreCT.org is not responsible for any damage or loss to vehicles or contents.

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Parking: Medium sized lot for “Residents Only” near 501 Hopewell Road Glastonbury, CT

Trail Map


Cotton Hollow is a popular swimming and hiking spot with locals, though everyone should be sure to visit it.  The main entrance near the Grange Pool is the trailhead for the .4 North Trail which follows Roaring Brook downstream through hemlock and black birch.  There is a great swimming hole along a series of cascades (ask me about the time I saved a dog stuck on a ledge at the swimming hole in November).  The area is similar to Natchaug State Forest and is a great place to spend time along the river.

The second trail at Cotton Hollow is the Tree Trail behind the restaurant near 841 CT Rt. 17.  Named for the many varieties of trees along the trail, most are marked for identification.  From the trail map, “It is hard to imagine that the area crossed by this trail was once a busy recreational park, popular with
trolley passengers from Hartford. ”

History:

Right next to the river (on private property) are the ruins of the Hartford Manufacturing Co. cotton mill part of the industrial corridor at Cotton Hollow. From the town’s site, “During the 18th and 19th centuries, the area was home to several gristmills, sawmills, iron foundries and a cotton mill. The imposing ruins of the cotton mill built in 1814 are still visible today. ”

From the Autumn article below, “One of the best-known mills in town was Pratt’s Forge, which once existed within the present-day preserve. Also known as South Glastonbury Iron Works, the company forged 3,900-pound anchors for oceangoing vessels out of New York City and for shipyards in Portland and Essex. In 1960, one of Pratt’s descendants, Amy Pratt, would be the first to donate land for the preserve.”


Links:

Hartford Courant (Marteka?) – Autumn in South Glastonbury’s Cotton Hollow

Peter Marteka – Glastonbury Aims to Preserve Storied History of Cotton Hollow

Waterfalls of New England – Cotton Hollow Cascades

The information shown here is for general reference purposes only. exploreCT.org gives no warranty, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy or reliability of this data. Parking in all areas, whether designated here or not, is at your own risk. exploreCT.org is not responsible for any damage or loss to vehicles or contents.

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Parking: Medium sized lot for “Residents Only” near 501 Hopewell Road Glastonbury, CT

Trail Map


Cotton Hollow is a popular swimming and hiking spot with locals, though everyone should be sure to visit it.  The main entrance near the Grange Pool is the trailhead for the .4 North Trail which follows Roaring Brook downstream through hemlock and black birch.  There is a great swimming hole along a series of cascades (ask me about the time I saved a dog stuck on a ledge at the swimming hole in November).  The area is similar to Natchaug State Forest and is a great place to spend time along the river.

The second trail at Cotton Hollow is the Tree Trail behind the restaurant near 841 CT Rt. 17.  Named for the many varieties of trees along the trail, most are marked for identification.  From the trail map, “It is hard to imagine that the area crossed by this trail was once a busy recreational park, popular with
trolley passengers from Hartford. ”

History:

Right next to the river (on private property) are the ruins of the Hartford Manufacturing Co. cotton mill part of the industrial corridor at Cotton Hollow. From the town’s site, “During the 18th and 19th centuries, the area was home to several gristmills, sawmills, iron foundries and a cotton mill. The imposing ruins of the cotton mill built in 1814 are still visible today. ”

From the Autumn article below, “One of the best-known mills in town was Pratt’s Forge, which once existed within the present-day preserve. Also known as South Glastonbury Iron Works, the company forged 3,900-pound anchors for oceangoing vessels out of New York City and for shipyards in Portland and Essex. In 1960, one of Pratt’s descendants, Amy Pratt, would be the first to donate land for the preserve.”


Links:

Hartford Courant (Marteka?) – Autumn in South Glastonbury’s Cotton Hollow

Peter Marteka – Glastonbury Aims to Preserve Storied History of Cotton Hollow

Waterfalls of New England – Cotton Hollow Cascades

The information shown here is for general reference purposes only. exploreCT.org gives no warranty, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy or reliability of this data. Parking in all areas, whether designated here or not, is at your own risk. exploreCT.org is not responsible for any damage or loss to vehicles or contents.